Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA - rcd 1)

 

Important information

With effect from 1st January 2010, the Kennel Club will only register Irish Setters that are proven to be clear of PRA-rcd1 (Progressive Retinal Atrophy) or hereditarily clear of PRA  e.g. both parents are clear.

 

Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) is a well-recognised inherited condition that many breeds of dog are predisposed to.  The condition is characterised by bilateral degeneration of the retina which causes progressive vision loss that culminates in total blindness.  There is no treatment for PRA, of which several genetically distinct forms are recognised, each caused by a different mutation in a specific gene.  The various forms of PRA are typically breed-specific, with clinically affected dogs of the same breed usually sharing an identical mutation.  Clinically affected dogs of different breeds, however, usually have different mutations, although PRA-mutations can be shared by several breeds. 

A mutation for an early-onset form of PRA, known as rcd1, was identified in Irish Setters as long ago as 1993, and is well-documented to affect dogs from a few weeks of age.   More recently dogs have been identified with a seemingly different form of PRA that affects dogs later in their lives and is known to be different from rcd1.  This alternative form became known as “LOPRA” – for Late-Onset PRA.  Unlike rcd1, where all dogs became affected at almost exactly the same age the age of onset of dogs with LOPRA varied, from a few years of age (2-3 yo) up to old age (10-11 yo).  It was unclear whether these dogs all shared the same form of PRA or whether there were genetically distinct forms of PRA segregating in this breed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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